Monsters in the Midwest Series

 

Available in eBook or paperback format on Amazon.

About the series:

Herb, Dallas, and Stanley live in northern Wisconsin, where life is nice and simple.

Until Herb becomes a vampire.
And Dallas becomes a werewolf.
And Stanley becomes a zombie.

Join the three friends on their hilariously awkward journeys as they learn that there really are monsters in the Midwest, and that’s not always a bad thing.

Wisconsin Vamp (Monsters in the Midwest, Book One)

“Midwestern nice” is hard to pull off when you’re a bloodthirsty monster…

When truckstop diner cook and mediocre bowler Herb Knudsen becomes a vampire, his once simple life gets a bit more complicated.

Herb’s not even sure how it happened. He wasn’t bitten by a vampire, which means there’s no one around to help him learn the ropes. With no one to guide him, Herb fumbles into his newfound abilities, courting disaster with every step.

Despite learning each new lesson the hard way, being a vampire isn’t all bad. He’s stronger, a little sexier, and a heck of a lot better at bowling. Even Lois, the girl of his dreams, is starting to notice him. But he can’t drink beer, the bodies are piling up, and his best friend Dallas isn’t just getting suspicious – he’s getting jealous.

When Lois is caught in the middle of the two friends’ escalating rivalry, keeping his dark secret becomes the least of Herb’s concerns.

Northwoods Wolfman (Monsters in the Midwest, Book Two)

When Dallas, the self-proclaimed Hero of Trappersville, is recruited by an ancient order of monster hunters, he’s more than happy to sign up. The group’s leader, Colton, is solid as an oak. Randall ain’t half bad, despite his tendency to whine. The whip-smart, beautiful, and totally badass Aletia is whip-smart, beautiful, and totally badass. Under their guidance, Dallas learns everything there is to know about hunting monsters (or close enough) and pledges to keep his friends safe.

Now there’s a werewolf in town, and Dallas and Stanley are on the case. As far as Dallas is concerned, monsters are monsters, and they have no place in Wisconsin.

Or do they? When an unexpected discovery and an unlikely reunion turn his world upside down, Dallas realizes he may not get to choose which side he’s on.

Undead Cheesehead (Monsters in the Midwest, Book Three)

Stanley’s lonely.

Before the strange events of the past few months, the self-proclaimed alien abductee and T.V. crime drama aficionado would drink and bowl with his friends, Herb and Dallas. But no one’s seen hide nor hair of Dallas in the longest, and Herb’s been spending all of his time with his girlfriend, Lois.

That just leaves Stanley, and Stanley’s lonely.

Everything changes when Stanley becomes a zombie. With each bite, he gains a new friend. Soon, he has more friends than he would’ve ever thought possible. If he could just sink his teeth into Herb, Lois, and Dallas, they’d all be together again, and everything would be perfect.

Meanwhile…

Everything changes when Stanley’s home is vandalized. After someone breaks all of his dinner plates and ruins his last hotdog, a zombie apocalypse overtakes Trappersville. To make matters worse, the Society shows up. Stanley and his supernatural friends are trapped between an ancient order of monster hunters and a hungry zombie horde. If that wasn’t bad enough, one zombie in particular looks a lot like Stanley.

Things aren’t looking good for the fine folks of Trappersville, Wisconsin. Will Stanley, his friends, and the entire town be lost?

Over Stanley’s dead bodies.

Additional works:

Scarecrow

Edited by Rhonda Parrish, published by World Weaver Press
Featuring Scott’s dark sci-fi short story, “If I Only Had an Autogenic Cognitive Decision Matrix”

Hay-men, mommets, tattie bogles, kakashi, tao-tao—whether formed of straw or other materials, the tradition of scarecrows is pervasive in farming cultures around the world. The scarecrow serves as decoy, proxy, and effigy—human but not human. We create them in our image and ask them to protect our crops and by extension our very survival, but we refrain from giving them the things a creation might crave—souls, brains, free-will, love. In Scarecrow, fifteen authors of speculative fiction explore what such creatures might do to gain the things they need or, more dangerously, think they want.

Within these pages, ancient enemies join together to destroy a mad mommet, a scarecrow who is a crow protects solar fields and stores long-lost family secrets, a woman falls in love with a scarecrow, and another becomes one. Encounter scarecrows made of straw, imagination, memory, and robotics while being spirited to Oz, mythological Japan, other planets, and a neighbor’s back garden. After experiencing this book, you’ll never look at a hay-man the same.

For Whom the Bell Trolls

Edited by John L. Monk and Lindy Moone
Featuring Scott’s horror-comedy short story, “Bay City Trollers”

It’s a Smorgasbord of Trolls!
Funny, touching, titillating and suspenseful, there’s a story for every adult reader in For Whom the Bell Trolls, a unique, illustrated “antrollogy” by 24 international authors. Arranged from light to meaty fare, the book’s “menu” offers up fanciful and farcical stories, family-oriented tales, romance, mystery, even magically surreal literary stories — starring all sorts of trolls, from the all-too-real Internet variety to the man-eating, bridge-dwelling trolls of legend.